ARIEL ADAMS’ EXCLUSIVE LOOK AT TIMEX AMERICAN DOCUMENTS™

American Documents watch, Black leather strap, white dial

You know what they say: Timing is everything.

Ariel Adams—owner, publisher and editor-in-chief of aBlogtoWatch—decided to take his first ever visit to our Timex headquarters in Middlebury, Connecticut and managed to get an exclusive first look at our American Documents™ collection.

Prior to taking a trip with our Design Director, Giorgio Galli, to visit the American suppliers coming together to make our made in America watches, Adams took the time to chat with us about his take on the collection, how he thinks it will shift perspectives on the Timex brand and the emotional connection people will make with this timepiece.

A noted watch enthusiast with a dedicated following, Adams admits he wasn’t expecting the news of our American Documents collection—our first American-made watch in decades.

“I would say I was pleasantly surprised and curious,” he says about his initial reaction to the project. “It makes sense for Timex to do this project, but it isn’t one that even serious brand devotees might expect. I recognize the large storytelling effort required to educate people like me as to what the product and the project are all about.”

Our American Documents collection brings together time-tested Swiss movement with beautiful, carefully-crafted American materials—including crystal made in Massachusetts, leather straps sourced and tanned in Minneapolis and a case back coin stamped in US-sourced brass and plated with “Aged Waterbury Brass,” all assembled by hand at our headquarters (located just seven miles from our original factory).

“American Documents watches contain a Swiss watch movement, but everything else you see and touch on the watch is made in the USA and uses parts from over a dozen American manufacturers, all curated by the Timex team,” Adams notes.

Adams has seen many of our watches and thought he had a pretty solid grasp on the brand and its direction. That is, until American Documents came along.

“Did I expect this from Timex? No,” Adams says. “But it’s very welcome and not something predictable from the brand.”

While many know us as an American brand, this collection is our first American-made watch in decades. What started as an idea quickly became a project the entire team was passionate about, setting us out to search for the highest quality American-made materials to create a watch that reflects the diverse people, culture and landscapes that inspire us every day.

“This is not a standard production,” Adams notes. “New supply chain, new development, new materials… this fundamentally changed how Timex made a watch. It’s not your everyday Timex.”

Adams had the chance to visit with some of the manufacturers whose parts were used in creating the American Documents watches.

“What an adventure it was to visit both a selection of the manufacturing partners and Timex’s incredible headquarters. It’s hard to package that experience for others, but it proved to me that American Documents isn’t just a marketing campaign but something real that is worth sharing. What I’ll remember most is the massive investment of time and effort the Timex team put into this project. What is also cool is the story of all the skills Timex as a historic watchmaker needed to relearn.”

“I think what was most interesting was the authentic pride and interest all the manufacturing partners had in this project,” Adams says. “They saw it as more than just another parts order and saw their relationship with Timex as different than that of just another client. I also think it’s interesting how challenging it is to make watch parts correctly and that many people have the notion it’s easy and that these parts can be made anywhere with relative ease.”

During his time at our headquarters, Adams also took note of how we fit into the narrative: Time as a brand and product that is quintessentially American.

“America has been one of the world’s most important makers of democratized technology. What they didn’t invent, they often made accessible to the masses. Timex has been integral with timepieces in this regard and now they release an emotional product, but one that maintains and serves those very same values.”

When asked about what he meant when he talked about the emotional value of the watch, he explains that people don’t buy watches because they need one; they buy watches because they want one. In the ‘90s, watches solidified its place in the fashion and style sphere. Consumers were now looking for more than just a watch; they wanted a watch that aligned with their style and their values.

So, what does this mean for the American Documents collection?

“For me, Timex always sat to the side,” Adams says. “The brand is so popular and well-known, I didn’t think there was anything they could add. They didn’t need me to talk about their products.”

But now, as American Documents is introduced for the first time, there is plenty to talk about.

To learn more about our American Documents collection, visit timex.com/americandocuments.

AMERICAN DOCUMENTS: TIMEX & AMERICAN WATCHMAKING

American Documents case back view of watch
Timex American Documents: American Watchmaking

American watchmaking isn’t a new concept.

In 1854, as the Waterbury Clock Company, we took clocks from the mantels of the 1% and brought them to the world. Our roots in Waterbury, Connecticut—the Brass City—allowed us to evolve clockmaking, switching from wooden gears to gears made of brass. This, along with our modernized factories, allowed us to create longer lasting, more affordable timepieces.

We didn’t stop there though. We’ve always been forward-thinking innovators. In 1901, produced the famous Dollar Pocket Watch that was so popular, writer Mark Twin bought two. Not too long after, we moved the pocket watch to the wrist. Originally issued as standard military equipment, wristwatches became the new civilian timepiece of choice after World War I came to an end.

Throughout the years, we introduced character watches and the nearly-indestructible V-Conic movement. With the belief that “good enough” wasn’t good enough, our watchmakers continued to think outside of the box and we continued to evolve.

In the mid-century, we introduced the world to the Timex name and what would become our modern brand with the watch that “takes a licking and keeps on ticking.” Every week, America tuned in as John Cameron Swayze put our watches to the test on live television. The slogan and our watches cemented Timex as a cultural icon.

The industry continued to evolve and change, shifting towards quartz watch movement for a longer lasting, more accurate timepiece that was more affordable to produce. This transition to quartz movement brought production to Asia.

And now, after decades, we brought watchmaking back home. Inspired by our people, culture and landscape, we set out to discover what it means to make a modern watch in America. Our watchmakers dusted off old tools and created new techniques to craft small batches of American-made watches at our headquarters in Connecticut—only seven miles away from our original factory.

Just like our very first mantle clocks created 165 years ago, our American Documents™ collection layers American ingenuity and craftsmanship with European precision to create truly amazing timepieces.

The collection currently features four striking American-made watches, drop forged in US-sourced stainless steel and hand finished to a brushed satin with a highly polished top ring. Impact-resistant Gorilla® Glass 3 protects the sub-second dial and gold-plated Swiss movement. The rich leather straps are made with American hides by American craftsmen. And right down to the details, the “Aged Waterbury Brass” case back coin and crown insert honor our original stamped brass clocks and our roots in Waterbury, Connecticut—the Brass City.

Creating an American-made Timex wasn’t easy.  We invested nearly three years to find and qualify America’s best craftsmen, capable of creating the precision parts worthy of a Timex. We had to invent new processes for making hands and convince auto parts manufacturers they were capable of making something as beautiful as a watch case.

We’re excited to bring watchmaking back to the US, and even more excited for you to join us on this journey.

Click here to learn more about American Documents

Pioneering Style

The Timex Archive project represents over 165 years of watchmaking innovation and expertise. This signature collection celebrates and honors the pioneering craftsmen who established Timex as a global leader in watchmaking. Inspired by our heritage, the Timex Archive capsule collection presents a new generation of timeless watches for a new generation of pioneers.

One of the more popular sets in the Timex Archive is the Pioneers collection. Influenced by military-inspired design and the great outdoors, this collection offers rugged and durable watches that combine quality craftsmanship and modern style for fashion-forward consumers who appreciate the attention to details. Great for camping and hiking, or simply a casual timepiece for everyday wear, the Pioneers collection is where you’ll find your new favorite watch.

Several of the watches in the Pioneers collection are based on the MK1 model, the Mil-Spec W-4637B that was manufactured for a brief period in 1982 and issued to U.S. Marines. One of the most popular is the MK1 40mm watch. A re-issue of the original MK1 36mm, this watch is lightweight and durable and presents a civilian version of the military issued timepiece. Featuring a 40mm aluminum case, fabric strap, quartz movement, date feature and INDIGLO® night-light, the MK1 40mm is a great companion for any adventurer.

timex archive mk1 40 mm

For a more refined look, the Allied Chronograph 42mm watch is a fine choice. Featuring a 42mm brass case, this timepiece makes a clean statement with its silver-tone stainless-steel bracelet that offers a stylish contrast to its black dial. The Allied Chronograph also has quartz movement, date feature and is water-resistant to 100 meters. This watch is also available with a fabric strap.

timex allied chronograph 42mm

For the pioneer who fancies maritime adventures, the Navi Ocean 38mm watch offers classic style and a reversible strap. Featuring a polished 38mm stainless steel case, the Navi Ocean is slightly smaller than other Pioneer styles but more in-line with fashion trends. The Navi Ocean has a quartz movement and is water resistant to 100 meters. The real appeal comes with the fabric reversible strap that offers either an indigo blue or blue and brown color compliments the blue watch dial.

timex navi ocean 38mm

Why the Easy Reader Endures

When it comes to watches, they don’t come much simpler than our Easy Reader®. For over 40 years, this basic watch has become synonymous with Timex and continues to be a best-seller.

As the wristwatch shifted from being purely functional to a fashion accessory, dial treatments began to rely on aesthetic values rather than readability. Timex, known for functional and reliable timepieces, went back to the company’s roots to provide a functional, reliable and readable wristwatch.

timex easy reader

Based on dials from the Waterbury Clock Company, Timex produced watches that could be easily read with a glance. The use of large, full Arabic numerals and bold hands, both in high contrast to the dial color provided consumers with a wristwatch that could be read from across a room.

Prior to 1977, the men’s size watches using dial treatments were marketed under the collection name Mercury. The smaller women’s size was sold as the Petite collection. In 1977, Timex applied to trademark the name Easy Reader® and began a national advertising campaign which included both print and television advertisements. The campaign touted Easy Reader as “The NEW watch with the BIG numbers”.

timex easy reader

Originally offered using white dials with black printed numerals and hands, the wrist watches resembled a traditional school clock. To broaden the collection to a full assortment, bold dial colors replaced the traditional white dial and darker colors, such as black and deep blue, utilized high contrast white printed numerals and hands to ensure readability even with a more fashionable look. Easy Reader quickly became the workhorse collection for Timex.

Since its introduction, the Easy Reader watch has seen many evolutions from basic black and white to bold colors, from simple leather straps to the iconic expansion band attachment. It has seen the addition of the INDIGLO® night-light feature, expanding its readability to absolutely any condition with a press of the crown.

3 Features to Love About the Timex® Marlin® Watch

As a faithful update to a beloved 1960s Timex watch, the Marlin® is the kind of timepiece that looks like you inherited it from Grandpa but shines like brand new. Its vintage-inspired appeal is for the old souls who appreciate the beauty of the past, while its modern construction is made for today’s wrist.

timex marlin

Here are the features that make the Timex Marlin such a distinctive and refined watch:

1. Fresh take on 1960s design
The updated Timex Marlin looks at ease as you turn up the energetic tunes of “The Twist,” tighten your tie and get ready for a night on the town, yet feels just as comfortable when you pull out your smartphone to book your shared ride. As a genuine vintage-inspired watch revival, the Marlin is true to its predecessors, seamlessly blending the 1960s feel into the modern watch wearer’s world.

The stainless-steel case and silver sunray dial mirror the original design, with a brushed effect that has a creamy, champagne hue when the light catches it. Stick dial markings alternate with stylized Arabic numerals, a trending look during the 1960s. The result is a modern watch with a classic, sophisticated appeal that upholds the Timex heritage.

timex marlin

2. Back to mechanical movement
A sincere tribute to the past, the modern Timex Marlin features the same reliable, hand-wound mechanical movement as the original. This vintage-inspired watch movement requires fine craftsmanship and routine winding by the wearer. You’ll want to wind the watch until you feel resistance on the crown, repeating this step daily so the watch doesn’t stop. The Marlin’s manual movement makes it easy to wind whether you’re holding the timepiece or wearing it on your wrist. As your watch keeps time, you’ll hear the characteristic ticking of mechanical movement.

3. Genuine, beautiful materials
As with any Timex watch, the Marlin is made with durable, high-quality materials. The glossy genuine leather strap comes in true black, complete with a textured lizard grain pattern to match the Marlin’s polished, vintage-inspired look. When you’re feeling a change, you can easily swap out the strap with another 18 mm leather band. The Timex Marlin is also water-resistant, which means this timepiece can withstand inevitable run-ins with rainy weather or splashes of water.

timex marlin

The watch is housed in a 34 mm polished stainless-steel case, topped with domed acrylic crystal. The case is almost identical to the original, aside from the higher-grade finishing of a modern timepiece. While smaller than many modern watches for men, this case size is period appropriate and also gives the watch a gender neutral appeal. (Couples watches, anyone?)

With that, say hello to your new vintage-inspired watch. The Timex Marlin pairs the purity, precision and pleasure of a hand-wound mechanical movement with the timeless refinement of sleek design. You can channel suave, 50s ad agency vibes as you head to the office, party or dinner date with this sophisticated updated timepiece.

From the Pocket to the Wrist

Prior to World War I, a watch nearly always referred to a pocket watch. The wristwatch was invented at the beginning of the twentieth century, but its market had been confined to military use. During the 1899-1902 Boer War in Africa, battle commanders used it to synchronize the movements of army units.

timex welton

The other wristwatch consumer was the fashionable women to whom French and Swiss designers introduced the timepiece as a stylish piece of jewelry. This created the perception that pocket watches were for men and wristwatches were for women.

This all changed during the Great War when the Ingersoll company transformed its ladies Radiolite Midget watch into a men’s military wristwatch by moving the crown to three o’clock, soldering on lugs and inserting a canvas strap. By the end of the war, many soldiers had become accustomed to the convenience of the wristwatch and it quickly replaced the pocket watch as their preferred timepiece.

timex welton

Fast forward to 2017 when Timex would update the classic Midget watch style for an exclusive launch in Japan. Following its success, Timex brought the watch to the U.S. in August of 2018. Replicating the look of the original but with a modern interpretation, the new watch, called the Welton, maintained the pocket watch shape but added a leather cuff on the strap made to be removable made from S.B. Foot Leather.

Two models of the Welton were launched. Both feature a 38mm case, quartz analog movement, leather slip-thru strap and INDIGLO® light-up watch dial. One has a stainless steel case with antique bronze finish and a cream dial while the other has a tumbled finish and black dial. Both are water resistant up to 30 meters.

From the Timex Archive

With over 160 years’ experience crafting innovative and quality timepieces, Timex has amassed quite a collection of styles in its archive. From its humble beginnings in the town of Waterbury, Connecticut, Timex started with a group of artisans and craftsmen who created what would ultimately become synonymous with time itself and propel timekeeping from the mantelpiece to the pocket, and on to the wrist.

timex archive

Rather than let classic and timeless watch styles fade into history, Timex launched the Timex Archive Project in 2016 to celebrate and honor those pioneering craftsmen. Inspired by our heritage, the Timex Archive capsule collection presents a new generation of timeless watches for a new generation of pioneers.

timex archive

This year in June, at the Pitti Uomo trade show in Florence, Timex introduced two new styles, the F3 Acadia and the IQ+ Move smartwatch. The F3 Acadia project is the ultimate evolution of the iconic Acadia field watch, created by Timex in the 90’s. Based on the F3 system (three feature system: lightweight, highly visible, and tough) the Acadia became the essential standard utility watch for daily duty in the field. In the new collection, cases are updated with colored lenses including purple, amber, blue and grey fume.

The IQ+™ Move smartwatch allows the wearer to track activity and sleep, create fitness goals, set alarms and control the hands of the watch with their phone.

Together with the F3 Acadia project, the Timex Archive Project features three collections:

timex archive

The Pioneers Collection presents military-inspired models combined with complex straps, some of them subject to exclusive stone washing treatments that replicate the aesthetics of vintage American field garments.

The Offspring Collection is a reinterpretation of the authentic collegiate style. Watches with a simple, classic taste brought alongside with straps that recall the colors, fabrics and design of College Club uniforms and ties from the 50’s and 60’s.

The Metropolis is an experimental collection with urban and contemporary inspiration. Most of the models are characterized by antiqued metal cases together with smoked color lenses, finding inspiration in both vintage style, military sunglasses and in cockpit instrumentation of today’s supersonic jets.

timex archive

Exclusive to the Archive collections is the original turntable that enables customers to create their own watch with the possibility of mixing eight cases with as many straps with different styles, materials and finishing.

timex archive

The straps by Timex Archive, are made with exclusive fabrics, express the competent know-how and the profound research that Timex does to offer something unique in the landscape of fashion accessories.

Automatics for the Everyone

During the 1960’s, prior to the revolution of quartz technology, timepieces operated through a mechanical watch movement. Two types of mechanical watches exist: the manual hand-wind and the automatic wind.

timex marlin automatic

Recently Timex launched the critically-acclaimed and commercially-successful hand-wind Marlin and now is following that up with an automatic Marlin. A timely take on the original, the new automatic Marlin maintains the classic look of the hand-wind, but in a 40mm size.

timex marlin automatic

Unlike hand-wind watches that need to be wound each day, an automatic, if worn daily, is automatically wound by the movement of the wearer. This movement will drive the weighed rotor to move, which winds the watch automatically.

The mechanical watch movement is driven by a spring (called a mainspring) which must be wound periodically. The release of the energy held in the mainspring is transmitted through a series of gears to power the balance wheel, a weighted wheel which oscillates back and forth at a constant rate.

timex marlin automatic

Often referred to as being ‘Analog in a Digital World’, automatic watches have a special place among watch enthusiasts who prefer the craftsmanship and artistry when compared to more common quartz watch movement.

Currently, the Marlin automatic is the only automatic watch made by Timex and pairs stainless steel, domed crystal and mechanical movements with the timeless sophistication of a sleek mid-century design. We’ve carefully selected every single detail to create a watch that takes a licking but keeps on ticking.

Wound Around the Marlin

During the 1960s, Timex scored a hit with the hand-wound Marlin® watch. Sensing the time was right for a reissue, Timex launched a highly successful update to the original in 2017 with a classic hand-wound mechanical movement.

Now, as demand for the Marlin continues, Timex is proud to partner with Mr. Porter and Todd Snyder in offering three new hand-wound Marlin styles with exclusive new color palettes and, for the first time ever, a design specifically made for women.

timex marlin

Hand-wind (also called manual wind) watches must be wound daily to prevent the movement from stopping. This is perfect for Marlin owners who most likely will make strapping on their Marlin a part of their morning routine. Simply wind the watch until you feel resistance on the crown. This should be repeated every day to prevent the watch from stopping.

Referred to as the Gentlemen’s Standard, the Timex Marlin pairs the purity and pleasure of a hand-wound mechanical movement with the timeless sophistication of a sleek design. The only hand-wound timepiece available by Timex, the Marlin has earned commercial and critical success and a new audience of watch enthusiasts who adore the reissue of a true mechanical watch.

timex marlin

Featuring a stainless-steel case, genuine leather strap or mesh band, 34mm case size, 18mm lug width and water-resistant up to 30 meters, the Marlin is a contemporary take on a timeless classic.

The three new Marlin hand-wound timepieces include: a stainless-steel case with a domed acrylic crystal and lizard pattern leather strap in black with gold-tone finish; a women’s version with white leather strap and rose gold-tone finish; and an all stainless-steel version with a mesh band.

timex marlin

The popularity of the Marlin has allowed Timex to offer two styles to exclusive men’s fashion sites, Toddsnyder.com (stainless-steel mesh band) and Mrporter.com (lizard pattern leather strap in black with gold-tone finish).

Elegant, classic and expertly crafted, the Timex hand-wound Marlins are a must for any watch enthusiast or anyone looking to make a sophisticated statement with their watch.

The Story of the MK1

TIMEX has a long history of producing military-inspired timepieces, but the most iconic style was the Mil-Spec W-46374B. This watch was manufactured for a very short period of time (two months, February and March, 1982) to standards that destined it to be a true throw-away watch. The case back on the original style could not be taken off to change the battery or make repairs and the simple movement and lightweight body made it truly disposable. Issued to the US Marines in 1982, this was the very beginning of the MK1 story.

timex mk1 watch

In 2016, TIMEX re-released the original 1982 MK1™ using a resin case with selected retailers globally. The light-weight appeal remains but the watch is no longer disposable and is constructed with the TIMEX stamp of quality, built to last.

In 2017, TIMEX adapts the revered MK1, using a contemporary adaptation of the iconic style, the MK1™ Aluminum stays true to TIMEX’ history of creativity and innovation. Lightweight and durable, the aluminum grade chosen for the MK1 is usually reserved for architectural applications.

timex mk1 watch

For 2018 the new MK1™ Stainless Steel carries a tough look and feel. We’ve strengthened the case to bring solid performance to our military-inspired collection. The MK1 Steel delivers a strong profile to attain distinction and quality, with an acrylic domed crystal it is complemented by a premium Italian woven fabric with steel eyelets to ensure a durable fit. Also, available with chronograph features to create additional functionality.